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Mexpert's Blog

Travel news and information on Mexico from Mexico.

Category Archives: Mexico City

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Betty Boop meets Dirty Harry in “The Roxie Hart Syndrome,” a short play
about a struggling actress who can’t get a break, and decides to take
matters into her own hands. She’s charming and you’re smitten in less time
than it takes to hail a cab — with your app.

Hers is just one of a dozen or so stories inspired by the world of burlesque
and condensed into captivating 15-minute performances at Micro Teatro
Mexico, a beehive of theatrical activity in Mexico City’s Colonia Santa
Maria la Ribera.

You can pick and choose the plays you want to see, or see everything spread
over several nights. Don’t miss all things burlesque, which runs for another
three weeks before the playwrights tackle a different topic. Performances
run Thursday through Sunday.

Micro Teatro Mexico
Roble 3, Col. Santa Maria la Ribera (Metro Buenavista)
Tel: 6390 5060

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There’s never been a better time to visit China … in Mexico. As part of the Year of China-Latin America Cultural Exchange, several great exhibits are showcasing Chinese contemporary art, as well as prized folk art and ancient artifacts.

· “Masterpieces from the National Art Museum of China” at Mexico City’s San Ildefonso Museum: A charismatic statue of Confucius greets visitors at the entrance to this exhibit, which features enchanting shadow puppets, Tibetan death masks and splashy ink wash paintings.

· “The Memory of Hands: The Splendor and Color of Guizhou’s Heritage” at Mexico City’s National Museum of Cultures: Guizhou province is home to nearly 20 of China’s 55 ethnic minorities, including the Miao, famed for their rococo silver creations.

· “Memories of the Oracle Bone Inscriptions,” at Acapulco’s San Diego Fort Museum, displays the mysterious millenary origins of China’s complex writing system.

Enter El Dragon

Mexico City’s leading tour bus operator, Turibus, launched a special China-themed tourism route on Nov. 9 called “The China Experience,” which combines guided visits of “Masterpieces” and “Memory” with lunch at one of the capital’s leading Chinese restaurants, El Dragon.

Known for its Peking duck roasted in a wood-burning oven, El Dragon has put together a special tasting menu of classic favorites for you to tuck into after working up an appetite at the museums.

The China Experience is available every Wednesday starting at 10 am, with the first pick up at the Auditorio Nacional stop. Don’t miss it.

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Alejandro Escalante, author of La Tacopedia, “the world’s first taco encyclopedia,” has put all that knowledge to work in the kitchen. Why just read about Mexico’s variety of regional tacos when you can also try them at his latest restaurant venture, La Casa de los Tacos? The full taco tour will take you from coast to coast. Where should you begin? Start with the sublime Tacos de Pechito made of beef breast slow cooked for six hours until it resembles something closer to beef butter, then spread on fresh handmade tortillas, topped with roasted onions and served with a selection of homemade salsas. It’s like brisket served Mexican style, says Escalante. After all, he adds, “the tortilla won the space race,” becoming the bread of choice on the International Space Station. But you don’t have to go that far. La Casa de los Tacos is located on the corner of Carrillo Puerto and Francisco Ortega, in Mexico City’s Coyoacan district.

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teacupSay “I hear you” with this unique tea set by ceramist Oscar Vazquez Alanis, part of the 6th Biennial of Utilitarian Ceramics at Mexico City’s Franz Mayer Museum. There’s lots more on show and it’s just as amusing, including candlesticks with a plumbing theme and a lamp that lights up a forest. In all, 89 pieces by 70 artists from 12 Mexican states.

The museum is also hosting the 1st Biennial of Silver Design, featuring 80 creations, some award winners.

Ceramics exhibit on through Jan. 12, silver biennial, until Jan. 19.

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Painter Johan Falkman

Many of us are inclined to think that, with the advent of photography, the art of portrait painting has gone the way of the dodo bird. Not so, proves Swedish painter Johan Falkman, whose newly inaugurated one-man show at Mexico City’s San Ildefonso museum features more than 90 of his “psychological portraits.”

Touted for reinventing the genre through his expressionist style, Falkman says his greatest inspiration has been Mexico’s muralists, including Siqueiros, Orozco and O’Gorman. Their influence is evident in his group and individual studies in oil featuring bold strokes, highly textured surfaces and vibrant colors more typical of tropical Mexico than northern Sweden, where artists tend to use more muted shades, says exhibit curator Leticia Lopez Orozco.

Falkman’s subjects are other Swedes, from well-known doctors to actors to members of the royal family, and occasionally himself. “All of the characters I have painted in this exhibition are experts at playing their roles,” says the artist, which is one reason he selected them. Are his subjects generally happy with the end result? “Some are quite happy, but there have also been people who have been completely destroyed by it,” he admits with a laugh. “Some people have been very shocked by my depiction of them, probably because I have focused on an aspect of their personality they were not aware of.”

Falkman talks with art critic Robert C. Morgan about his career and artistic process Saturday, March 24, at 1pm (in English, with simultaneous translation). Also, art students and teachers are invited to watch the artist at work, from Tuesday, March 27, to Thursday, March 29, 10 am to 1 pm; reservations required by calling 5789 2505 or emailing pedagogicos@sanildefonso.org.mx.

  • Johan Falkman, La alteridad en el espejo
  • Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso
  • Justo Sierra 16, Centro Historico
  • Until July 15, 2012

 

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Mexico City’s booming western suburb of Santa Fe is really a city within a city, with its own business district, schools, restaurant row(s), shopping centers, residences and hotels. Already home to a Sheraton Suites (the area’s first hotel), Fiesta Americana and Fiesta Inn, Westin, Camino Real, NH (Spanish chain), Novotel (French chain) and Distrito Capital, a Mexican design hotel, Santa Fe will soon see the opening of a 223-room Marriott and a Presidente InterContinental, along with branches of its top restaurants Au Pied de Cochon and Palm. For more new and noteworthy developments in the neighborhood, read on.

LUCY SHANGHAI: Sleek, spacious and with a ceiling reminiscent of Beijing’s Bird’s Nest stadium, this modern “Oriental urban kitchen & bar” borrows from East Asian cuisines, including Thai, Malaysian and Vietnamese, to create its own signature dishes. Choose a roomy table indoors or out on the wide covered terrace and let Memorias de una geisha, a sweet-and-sour cassis-and-cranberry martini, or Bali Waves, a refreshing blend of gin, lemongrass, ginger, lime and ginger ale, welcome you to the Lucy Shanghai experience.

No relation to Joe’s Shanghai, a favorite NYC spot for pork dumplings, Lucy nevertheless serves a spectacular version of her own. A Latin-Asian fusion, the Dumplings de Pancetta are rice-flour empanadas filled with soy sauce-and-wine marinated pancetta sautéed in a spicy chipotle chili sauce (100 pesos). There are six dumplings to an order so you can share if you must. Other mouthwatering starters include the Shanghai fish ’n chips (bass tempura with a citrus mayo dip; 170 pesos) and Min Pao de Cerdo o Pollo (sweet-and-sour minced ribs or chicken thighs served with steamed Chinese-style tortillas; 80 pesos).

Star dishes include a fabulous Asian chicken almondine made with breaded chicken breast in a crunchy toasted almond crust (180 pesos) and smoked Peking duck three days in the making served with wok fried rice flavored with duck juices, sesame seed tortillas and plum sauce (260 pesos). Leave room for dessert. Like everything else on the menu, the desserts are infused with the flavors and aromas of the orient, including the seasoned tapioca and ginger chocolate mousse.

  • Lucy Shanghai
  • Juan Salvador Agraz 97
  • T: 5292 4022

WONDERFUL WORLD OF WINE: You’re probably familiar with the concept of food and wine pairing, but do you know which varietal brings out the best in a Habano? Delving a little deeper into the wonderful world of wine, the Sheraton Suites Santa Fe Hotel this week kicked off the first of eight Wednesday night wine workshops that go beyond the cursory to reveal a little more about wines from around the world and why we love them. Each session showcases a variety of grape, from Chardonnay to Shiraz, and a different winemaking region, along with related topics like the health benefits of wine, the increasing popularity of artisanal cheeses, and changes in wine production. Coming up next week is Spanish wine tasting, featuring “guest grape” tempranillo. Side dish? Spain’s legendary aged ham, Jamon Iberico, also known as pata negra, how it’s made and why sybarites the world over make such a fuss over it. Each workshop costs 390 pesos per person (free for hotel guests), including discounts on purchases; dinner/workshop packages are available.

PLAZA SAMARA: The area’s newest shopping center has a smart collection of shops, as well as a select gourmet supermarket. When complete, the complex, which includes office towers, will also house Santa Fe’s Marriott hotel.

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On January 6, three South American passengers land at Mexico City’s Benito Juarez International Airport only to get sucked into a bureaucratic black hole generated by baffling immigration procedures and the bungling or corrupt officials handling them. That’s the premise of the play “Juarez 6.01,” a hilarious and hard-hitting political farce in which nothing is clear and no one is innocent, including the alleged offenders, each of whose motives for being in Mexico is murkier than the next.

“Nobody comes off looking good in this play,” says director Ernesto Alvarez, an Uruguayan who has lived in Mexico for the past 15 years. “Deceit is a constant theme throughout the story, but it also touches on the Latin American exodus, fleeing the dictatorships, searching for better opportunities abroad, the expatriate experience.”

Written by Mexican actor-director Eduardo Castañeda, “Juarez” features well-known Argentinean-born actor Juan Carlos Colombo, who has lived in Mexico since 1975 and appeared in the groundbreaking 2003 film “La Ley de Herodes” (released in the U.S. as “Herod’s Law”). The play stars Juan Carlos Medellin as an affable yet rotten-to-the-core immigration agent eager to profit from the misfortune of others.

  • Juarez 6.01, El respeto al derecho me es ajeno
  • Teatro Casa de la Paz, Cozumel 33, Colonia Roma
  • T. 5286 5315; tdelapaz@correo.uam.mx
  • Until April 15: Thursday/Friday at 8 pm, Saturday/Sunday at 6 pm
  • General admission: 150 pesos

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